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pastry dough (i.e. pate brisee)

• 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon sugar
• 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small pieces
• 1/4 to 1/2 cup cold tap water

1. In a bowl, combine flour, salt, and sugar. Add butter, and cut it in with a pastry cutter until the mixture resembles coarse meal.
2. While mixing with a wooden spoon, add cold tap water slowly. Mix until dough holds together without being wet or sticky; be careful not to mix too much. To test, squeeze a small amount together: If it is crumbly, add more ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time.
3. Divide dough into two equal balls. Flatten each ball into a disc and wrap in plastic. Label them as yours and transfer to the refrigerator and chill at least 1 hour. Dough may be stored, frozen, up to 1 month.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. Patrick Case permalink
    September 24, 2012 9:38 am

    Hi people:

    I’m really busy this semester and I’ve been thinking about making five or six pounds of pâté brisee, cutting it into pie shell sized blocks and freezing it for later use. How long will this stuff keep in a freezer?

  2. Patrick Case permalink
    September 24, 2012 9:38 am

    Oh sorry, I see that you say one month. That’s it??!!

    • Food School permalink*
      November 10, 2012 5:11 pm

      Sorry for the late reply!!! OMG.

      Yes, you can store this dough for much longer as long as it’s well wrapped. Make sure its already formed in to some kind of flat-ish puck as well, that will help it thaw and be easier to use.

      Good luck!

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